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Martisor une très Belle fête Roumaine symbolisant le Début de Printemps ! C’est quoi le Martz isor ?


le 1er Mars – la fête du Martzishor corner.gif le Martzishor red_corner.gif
  • Une très belle tradition est associée au doux nom de mărţişor qui est le symbole du printemps.

Qu’est-ce que le “mărţişor” ?

Le “mărţişor” (diminutif de “martie – mars”) est offert à l’aube du 1er Mars et on le porte attaché à la poitrine tout le long du mois de mars, après quoi il est suspendu à un arbre fleuri, dans l’espoir que toute l’année serait fleurie.

Le mărţişor est une fine ganse formée de deux fils tressés, l’un blanc et l’autre rouge, auxquels on peut attacher une petite figurine en bois ou en métal (un coeur, une lettre, une fleur, un fer à cheval ou un trèfle à quatre feuilles) qui joue le rôle de porte-bonheur.

Filles et garçons, femmes et hommes peuvent offrir des “mărţişor” à leurs amis, leurs amours, leurs familles. La seule contrainte traditionnelle étant de mêler deux brins de couleurs rouge et blanche, on n’hésite pas à confectionner les “mărţişor” personnellement. Quant aux marchands, qui sont souvent aussi les créateurs, rivalisent d’ingéniosité dans le confectionnement des “mărţişor”.

Le rouge et le blanc mêlés représentent les deux saisons qui se mélangent encore. Le rouge c’est l’hiver (peut-être parce qu’on y fait rougeoyer l’âtre) et le blanc, le printemps qui s’annonce avec la pousse du perce neige, fleur symbolisant le retour de la nature à la vie.

Institut Anca Anca Cercel N.D.
514 -996-9471

 
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Posted by on March 1, 2013 in Spirituality

 

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Martisor .. An Old Romanian Tradition ! À Talisman , Symbolizing the Start of Spring , bringing Happine ss , Love and Health to All Wearing on 1 Of March !!


Mărțișor (Romanian pronunciation: [mərtsiʃor]) is an old Romanian celebration at the beginning of spring, on March the 1st, which according to old calendar was also considered as the beginning of the new year.[1] Symbolically, it is correlated to women and to fertility as a means of life and continuity. The tradition is authentic in Romania, Moldova, and all territories inhabited byRomanians and Aromanians. Alike though not identical customs can be found in Bulgaria (seeMartenitsa), while similar ones exist in Albania,[2]Greece [3][not in citation given] and Italy.[4]

The name Mărțișor is the diminutive of marț, the old folk name for March[5] (Martie, in modern Romanian), and thus literally means “little March”. It is also the folk name for this month.

Mărțișor, marț and mărțiguș are all names for the red and white string from which a small decoration is tied, and which is offered by people on the 1st day of March. The string can also be black and white, or blue and white)[6] Giving this talisman to people is an old custom, and it is believed that the one who wears the red and white string will be strong and healthy for the year to come. It is also a symbol of the coming spring. Usually, both women and men wear it pinned to their clothes, close to the heart, until the last day of March, when they tie it to the branches of a fruit-tree. In some regions, a gold or silver coin hangs on the string, which is worn around the neck. After wearing it for a certain period of time, they buy red wine and sweet cheese with the coin, according to a belief that their faces would remain beautiful and white as cheese, and rubicund as the red wine, for the entire year.[7]

In modern times, and especially in urban areas, the Mărțișor lost most of its talisman properties and became more of a symbol of friendship or love, appreciation and respect. The black threads were replaced with red, but the delicate wool ropes are still a ‘cottage industry’ among people in the countryside, who comb out the wool, dye the floss, and twist it into thousands of tassels. In some areas the amulets are still made with black and white ropes, for warding off evil.[8]

Institut Anca Anca Cercel N.D.
514 -996-9471

 
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Posted by on March 1, 2013 in Spirituality

 

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Protection of EVIL EYE ! This Talisman made its Way Through History and Different Cultures !!!


A good example is feeling watched.
We intuitively know when someone is looking at us even when our back is turned. Knowing that, it’s not hard to understand how cultures could believe in the power of the evil eye – and of other’s thoughts.
The evil eye concept has moved into the feng shui realm and it’s common now to see the blue eye talisman displayed in Asian emporiums. Commonly called a ‘nazar’ in Turkey, the blue eye is used wherever there is a concern of jealousy and is meant to provide protection against the withering, desiccating effect of the evil eye.
Nazars are often placed at the entrance to a home, in offices, carried on your person, or worn as a charm. These are displayed to ward off the negative intentions of others who may be jealous or envious of your looks, your possessions or your relationships.
Often associated with the color blue and with fish, the nazar is associated with water because of the drawing and drying effect that the evil eye brings with it, and water’s ability to counter the withering ability of the evil eye.

Institut Anca
Anca Cercel N.D.
514 -996-9471

 
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Posted by on February 8, 2013 in Spirituality

 

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For the Believers .. An Evil Eye Protection Talisman !!


Phrases and rituals are not the only way to protect against the power of the evil eye. The most popular method of escaping the evil eye’s effects in many cultures is by the use of evil eye talismans, evil eye symbols, and evil eye jewelry. These are meant to “reflect” the power of the evil look. The evil eye amulet originated in Greece, where it was known as an “apotropaic” amulet, meaning that it reflected harm. The most basic design of the evil eye, prevalent in the Middle East, is a talisman designed with concentric blue and white circles made to symbolize the evil eye, known as the nazar. It is often used on houses, vehicles, or jewelry.

 
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Posted by on January 21, 2013 in Spirituality

 

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